4 Questions You Asked About Trump’s Second Impeachment

1. Why is it a big deal that Trump was impeached again?

  • Trump is the first president to be impeached twice.
  • He’s the only president to be impeached for actions leading to the interruption of government.

2. The Senate still needs to convict, right?

  • Yes, the Senate will hold an impeachment trial.
  • The House Impeachment managers act as the prosecution. Trump’s lawyers act as the defense, and the Senators act as the Jury.
  • Two thirds of the Senators must vote guilty in order to convict him. That means 67 Senators must vote to convict.

3. Would conviction change anything for Trump?

  • If convicted, the Senate can vote to prevent him from holding any future office. He could not run for president again.
  • Trump – or others – could be subject to criminal charges based on the evidence.
  • There’s a slight possibility that Trump could lose some lifetime  benefits, like office space or some travel expenses.

4. Why have a trial if he’s already out of office?

  • History – The impeachment tells future congresses  that Incitement to Insurrection is grounds for impeachment.
  • The senate will likely bring witnesses, documents, and other evidence of what really happened.
  • It will create a formal record of the events of Jan 6, 2021.

References

The New York Times. Trump Impeachment

U.S. Congress. 117th Congress (2021-2022). H.Res.24 – Impeaching Donald John Trump, President of the United States, for high crimes and misdemeanors.

United States Senate. Powers & Procedures. The Senate’s Impeachment Role.

Reuters. December 17, 2019. Explainer: How Trump’s impeachment trial would differ from a criminal one.

National Archives. (3 U.S.C. 102 note) Former Presidents Act

United States Congress. Public Law 112-257-Jan. 10, 2013. H.R. 6620. Former Presidents Protection Act of 2012 18 USC 1 note